2006 IBC StructuraVSeismic Design Manual, Vol. 2

2006 IBC StructuraVSeismic Design Manual, Vol. 2

2006 IBC Structural/Seismic Design Manual Volume 1: Code Application Examples

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  • Comment: In reality, the steel joist along line 9 may not act in tension as a subdiaphragm
    chord as shown above. It will be loaded in tension only when compressive wall anchorage
    forces act on the diaphragm. Under this loading, the seismic forces probably do not
    follow the subdiaphragm path shown above but are transmitted through the wood
    framing to other parts of the diaphragm. Even if subdiaphragm action does occur, the
    subdiaphragm may effectively be much deeper than shown. However, because it is
    necessary to demonstrate that there is a system to resist the out--of-plane forces on the
    diaphragm edge, the subdiaphragm system shown above is provided.
    2006 IBC StructuraVSeismic Design Manual, Vol. 2

    !1 Oe.l Design girder (continuity tie) connection to wall panel
    In this example, walls are bearing walls and pilasters are not used to support the
    joist-girder vertically. Consequently, the kind of detail shown in Figure 5-25 must
    be used. This detail provides both vertical support for the girder and the necessary
    2006 IBC StructuraVSeismic Design Manual, Vol. 2

  • Note: The story drift limitations of§ 12.12.1 are not intended to apply to
    flexible diaphragm deflections, but instead are intended to apply to the acting
    lateral-resisting wall or frame systems. These limitations on building drift were
    primarily developed for the classic flexible frame system with rigid diaphragm.
    Story drift limits are designed to ensure that the frames and walls do not
    excessively distort in plane. Similarly, the P-delta limitations of§ 12.8.7 are also
    intended to restrict in-plane movements of the vertical seismic resisting system,
    especially in flexible frames resisting vertical and lateral forces together while
    subjected to potentially large secondary moments (Tilt-up buildings generally
    have stiff concrete shear walls that are not impacted by secondary moments from
    in-plane P-delta effects).
    2006 IBC StructuraVSeismic Design Manual, Vol. 2

2006 IBC StructuraVSeismic Design Manual, Vol. 2