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Bryman, A. (2004) The Disneyization of Society, London: Sage Publications Ltd.
The Disneyization of society
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Bryman, Alan. The Disneyization of Society. London: SAGE Publications Ltd, 2004. SAGE Knowledge. Web. 13 Jul. 2016.

The Disneyization of Society

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  • Bryman, Alan. "Disneyization." The Disneyization of Society. London: SAGE Publications Ltd, 2004. 1-14. SAGE Knowledge. Web. 13 Jul. 2016.

    Bryman, Alan. "Disneyization." The Disneyization of Society. London: SAGE Publications Ltd, 2004. 1-14. SAGE Knowledge. Web. 13 Jul. 2016.

  • Disneyization of a society is becoming popular in several countries and New Zealand is no exception. There are four characteristics that define disneyfication of a society: theming, hybrid consumption, merchandising and performative labour.

    2. Emotional labour can be well-defined by ways of a strength involved in carrying out emotional instruction to fulfil with personal demands required in order to execute a job in a business (Monaghan, 2006). Having good or negative emotions has its own consequences in an organisation. First and foremost, it is vital for an organisation to have personnel’s that portray good emotional labour because this will lead to a component of the service that the organisation is providing. In other words, emotional labour is a basis of differentiation (Bryman, 2004). For example, when an employee is at work and gives out good feelings towards their job in handling customers, customers would feel that they are handled well and therefore, they would remember the organisation because of the decent facilities that has been given to them (Bryman, 2004). Moreover, organisations that have an extensive range of challengers would value having differentiation in terms of emotional labour because clients would be contented to come back because the facility provided was an impressive one (Bryman, 2004). This would be an essential part for the organisation because without customers there wouldn’t be sales and the organisations would find it difficult to survive (Bryman, 2004). This is because; customers are the assets of any organisation (Bryman, 2004). Therefore it is very important for a business to secure its “customer assets” (Groth, et al., 2006). In addition, in organizations that provide services such as call centres, where employees are usually required to manage their emotional expression toward customers (Hochschild, 1983 cited in Bryman, 2004), they should have good emotions because what they say or how they speak on the phone will affect the status of the organisation that they are employed for (Bryman, 2004). So it is vital for the employees to display appropriate positive emotional expression for example expressing a smile on the phone in customer service call centres (Ghalandari, et al., 2012). As stated in the article “Disneyization of Society written by the author Bryman, customers are...

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  • The Disneyization of Society
    Alan Bryman
    Anteprima limitata - 2004

    Alan Bryman in his most excellent book, The Disneyization of Society, defines Disneyization as the process whereby everything becomes..well, Disneyized. He proposes a formula that is applicable not only to Disney, but to other entities (including scuzzy tourist traps) that seek to accomplish a particular experience for the visitor. Bryman uses this term, and I believe coins this term, in order to distinguish this formula from “Disneyification,” which is a term with some serious negative connotations.

The Disneyization of Society | DeepDyve

Alan Bryman in his most excellent book, The Disneyization of Society, defines Disneyization as the process whereby everything becomes..well, Disneyized. He proposes a formula that is applicable not only to Disney, but to other entities (including scuzzy tourist traps) that seek to accomplish a particular experience for the visitor. Bryman uses this term, and I believe coins this term, in order to distinguish this formula from “Disneyification,” which is a term with some serious negative connotations.