Eunice Pinney, "The Courtship", 1815.

Eunice Griswold Pinney, "Two Women", atercolor, Conn., 112"x14", 1815.

For Eunice Pinney by Eunice Pinney - 16" x 20" Framed Premium Canvas Print

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  • Eunice Pinney (1770–1849) Windsor, Connecticut 1809 Watercolor, pencil, and ink on paper 13 7/8 x 11 3/4 in. American Folk Art Museum purchase

    Do you think you may own a painting by Eunice Pinney? We authenticate, appraise and research all paintings by this great artist. Eunice Pinney was an early American folk artist who painted scenes of love and "women's interests" in the early 19th century. Born in Simsbury, Connecticut to a wealthy family, Pinney generally used watercolor to create her folk art scenes of men and women in the countryside.

  • Do you think you may own a painting by Eunice Pinney? We authenticate, appraise and research all paintings by this great artist. Eunice Pinney was an early American folk artist who painted scenes of love and "women's interests" in the early 19th century. Born in Simsbury, Connecticut to a wealthy family, Pinney generally used watercolor to create her folk art scenes of men and women in the countryside.

    Pinney was one of few female artists active during the colonial and early American period that is still recognized today. She is also known as Eunice Griswold Pinney and Eunice Griswold Holcombe Pinney. While little is known about her life and artistic training, it is almost certain that Pinney was a self taught artist, and probably created the bulk of her oeuvre while in her thirties. She raised five children, was twice married and was a very active figure in her community of Windsor, Connecticut.

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    19th-century American painters > Eunice Pinney

    American people of English descent > Eunice Pinney

    American women painters > Eunice Pinney

    Painters from Connecticut > Eunice Pinney

    19th-century women artists > Eunice Pinney

    American watercolorists > Eunice Pinney

    Folk artists > Eunice Pinney

    People from Simsbury, Connecticut > Eunice Pinney

    Pinney was one of few female artists active during the colonial and early American period that is still recognized today. She is also known as Eunice Griswold Pinney and Eunice Griswold Holcombe Pinney. While little is known about her life and artistic training, it is almost certain that Pinney was a self taught artist, and probably created the bulk of her oeuvre while in her thirties. She raised five children, was twice married and was a very active figure in her community of Windsor, Connecticut.

Eunice Pinney | Lot | Sotheby's, Ralph Esmarian collection

In the post-Revolutionary era, academies of learning for girls proliferated in the New England landscape. Even so, the education Eunice Griswold Pinney received was rather remarkable for the day, and she was known as “a woman of uncommonly extensive reading.” Pinney’s first marriage ended in divorce. Her second marriage, to Butler Pinney in 1797, proved more stable, and it was at this time—as a mature woman rather than a schoolgirl—that she began to paint the watercolors for which she is remembered today. In this tribute to Reverend Ambrose Todd (1764–1809), the rector of St. Andrew’s Church in Simsbury from 1787 to 1799, Pinney has freely adapted the codified elements of mourning art into an original and personal composition. During his tenure Reverend Todd married the Pinneys.