The Four Musketeers ~ Quality and Trust

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The Four Musketeers

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  • TAG : The Four Musketeers Movie Review - Common Sense Media
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  • The Four Musketeers, a troupe of outstanding French tennis players who dominated the sport in the late 1920’s through the early 1930’s, achieved Dream Team status long before the term had even been coined. Their unprecedented achievements and invincible spirit were certainly the stuff of which dreams are made, yet it took an American-born competition to make their Dream Team a reality.

    One of the jewels of the Label X library -- and that is saying something, considering what else is in there -- this CD represents some of the most exquisite music in 's output. The music for 's The Four Musketeers has the composer working in a distinctly European mode, very much in the manner of period concert music (ranging across a couple of centuries, as well as embracing the Hollywood and 1950's European film traditions) -- but the scoring and orchestrations, as well as some of the twists in tempo, show a few exotic twists in the details that are pure . The result is sort of 's version of what could have been an score -- and it's worth every minute of the listening, repeated many times over. The CD is filled out with 's music for two World War II-related subjects, the thriller The Eagle Has Landed and the drama Voyage of the Damned. The former, written for a fictional thriller, relies on rich, frenzied string passages, very much in the manner of early but more animated, and ultimately -- at least until the end credit music -- very interesting to hear, even divorced from the film. The latter is much more restrained and takes its time getting listeners to where it is going, with scoring that is far more closely tied to its period (1939) and setting -- "effect" music as much as dramatic scoring, with some of the music written in the styles of the times, including a Latin-flavored section for "Hotel Nacionale" and a foxtrot for the end credit music. The quality of the recording of all three scores is excellent, and the CD transfer improves upon the original LP release. The only complaint about the compact disc edition is the lack of a numerical track list anywhere -- on the tray card, in the notes, or the back cover -- to delineate where each score ends and begins.

  • King Louis (Jean-Pierre Cassel) counseled by Richelieu (Charlton Heston) who sends spy Rochefort (Christopher Lee) to kidnap Constance (Raquel Welch) while about domestic business with D’Artagnan (Michael York), Milady (Faye Dunaway) conspiring, in the sequel, The Four Musketeers, 1975.

    On that fateful day in 1927, however, their resilience and fortitude finally paid off. In a victory which sent shock waves throughout the sports world, the Four Musketeers snatched the silver bowl from the Americans and the Dream Team of tennis was born. Even before the excited teammates had the chance to pass around the silver cup, plans were underway in Paris to build a new stadium that would house the Davis Cup rematch the following year.

  • One of the jewels of the Label X library -- and that is saying something, considering what else is in there -- this CD represents some of the most exquisite music in 's output. The music for 's The Four Musketeers has the composer working in a distinctly European mode, very much in the manner of period concert music (ranging across a couple of centuries, as well as embracing the Hollywood and 1950's European film traditions) -- but the scoring and orchestrations, as well as some of the twists in tempo, show a few exotic twists in the details that are pure . The result is sort of 's version of what could have been an score -- and it's worth every minute of the listening, repeated many times over. The CD is filled out with 's music for two World War II-related subjects, the thriller The Eagle Has Landed and the drama Voyage of the Damned. The former, written for a fictional thriller, relies on rich, frenzied string passages, very much in the manner of early but more animated, and ultimately -- at least until the end credit music -- very interesting to hear, even divorced from the film. The latter is much more restrained and takes its time getting listeners to where it is going, with scoring that is far more closely tied to its period (1939) and setting -- "effect" music as much as dramatic scoring, with some of the music written in the styles of the times, including a Latin-flavored section for "Hotel Nacionale" and a foxtrot for the end credit music. The quality of the recording of all three scores is excellent, and the CD transfer improves upon the original LP release. The only complaint about the compact disc edition is the lack of a numerical track list anywhere -- on the tray card, in the notes, or the back cover -- to delineate where each score ends and begins.

The Four Musketeers (1974) - YouTube

Now surprising as this may seem. That puts The Four Musketeers in the top 98% of the population, the majority of the population, put more effort into planning next years vacation than they do in there business or work life… so guess what they stall… not very much happens, they coast they get by… By setting goals and sharing them, even if they don’t get everything done The SFM Four Musketeers are putting them selves outside their comfort zone, stating their intentions and then at the end of the week checking off what they have done.