Emile Hirsch as Alexander Supertramp in Into the Wild

Scenes from Into the wild – Click thumbnails for full image….

Into the Wild

$15.00
  • Review
  • TAG : Yay! You're now following Into the wild in your .
ADD TO CART
  • The story of Chris McCandless, a young man who embarked on a solo journey into the wilds of Alaska and whose body was discovered four months later, explores the allure of the wilderness

    In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his

  • Into the Wild is probably one of movies that inspires me the most to go out and travel the world. Even just listening to the soundtrack makes me think of all the great experiences I had. The song “Society” by Eddie Vedder actually inspired me to cycle from Thailand to China. Into the Wild is definitely one of my favorite movies of all time!

    Jo – what a great review. I haven’t read this book but recently read The Other by David Guterson and parts of that story reminded me a lot of Into the Wild. I loved the film and Eddie Vedders song ‘Society’ is one of my favourites ever. I wondered if the book could live up to the film (unusual as it’s often the other way around) but I think after reading your review, I will give it a go. I agree with you, very sad and not easy to forget.

    Into the Wild

  • Kellie_O More than 1 year ago
            People today are getting caught in the net of technology. We are getting used to having everything, and we forget what it is like to have nothing. Our world is made up of a beautiful thing called nature. Sometimes I even forget. Mother Nature is a beautiful place free from cars, money, and just everything in general. In the book INTO THE WILD, I realized just how selfish and oblivious we all are. I am just one person, of many, that don't pay enough attention to the simple things in life that we take for granted.         Alex, the main character in the book, is overwhelmed with all the money and gifts after graduation. He decides to give it all up and go into the wild. I know that I would never do what he did because, honestly, I would not be able to survive. Alex becomes so overwhelmed with everything that is happening in his life, that he decides to go into the wild and get away from everyone and everything. “I don’t want to know what time it is. I don’t want to know what day it is or where I am. None of that matters (3)". This shows that he really doesn't care about anything else in the world, other than the exact moment that he is living in.         I honestly was a little bit confused with this book because it isn't a story. It is more like a bunch of interviews put into a book format. Also the names keep switching back and forward between Alex and Chis, his name in real life. Other than that, this book was very interesting and it takes you on a inspiring journey. This book showed me that if I don't like the direction that my life is going, then change it.

    In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of "Into the Wild."
    Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir. In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his cash. He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and, unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented. Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away. Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild.
    Jon Krakauer constructs a clarifying prism through which he reassembles the disquieting facts of McCandless's short life. Admitting an interst that borders on obsession, he searches for the clues to the dries and desires that propelled McCandless. Digging deeply, he takes an inherently compelling mystery and unravels the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons.
    When McCandless's innocent mistakes turn out to be irreversible and fatal, he becomes the stuff of tabloid headlines and is dismissed for his naivete, pretensions, and hubris. He is said to have had a death wish but wanting to die is a very different thing from being compelled to look over the edge. Krakauer brings McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows, and the peril, adversity, and renunciation sought by this enigmatic young man are illuminated with a rare understanding--and not an ounce of sentimentality. Mesmerizing, heartbreaking, "Into the Wild" is a "tour de force." The power and luminosity of Jon Krakauer's stoytelling blaze through every page.

Into the Wild - Trailer - YouTube

In April 1992, after he graduated with a first in college, Chris McCandless set off alone into the Alaskan wild. He gave all his savings ($24,000) to Oxfam, abandoned his car and his possessions, and burnt the money in his wallet, determined to live a life of independence and living off the earth.