“Legend Of The Poinsettia” Ornaments - Oriental Trading

The Legend of the Poinsettia By Mrs. Knott

Reading Unit for Legend of the Poinsettia ***** TGIF- Third Grade Is Fun*****

The Legend of the Poinsettia

$6.99
  • Review
  • TAG : Video version of Tomie dePaola's book Legend of the Poinsettia
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  • The Legend of the Poinsettia by Tomie dePaola. $6.99. Publisher: Puffin (October 6, 1997). Reading level: Ages 4 and up. Publication: October 6, 1997. Author: Tomie dePaola

    This video tells the story of the legend of the poinsettia using the illustrations of Tomie dePaola. The narrator is Tomie dePaola. I purchased the audio book through Kindle. It's great to have this wonderful story read to students by the author himself!

  • Poinsettias are native to Mexico, where they grow wild. The enchanting legend of the poinsettia dates back several centuries, to a Christmas Eve in Mexico when a little girl named Pepita had no gift to present to the Christ child. Her cousin Pedro urged her to give a humble gift. So, on her way to church she gathered some weeds she found along the road. As she approached the altar, a miracle happened: The weeds blossomed into brilliant flowers. Then they were called Flores de Noche Buena - Flowers of the Holy Night. Now they are called poinsettias.

    I used this activity as a summative assessment for figurative language. We read Tomie dePaola's, "The Legend of the Poinsettia". My students created a figurative language poinsettia to show what they learned. They did a really great job and learned a lot!

    The Legend of the Poinsettia
    Tomie dePaola
    Limited preview - 1997

  • History and Legend of the Poinsettia

    Pointsettias: Christmas paper craft - read "The Legend of the Poinsettia" by Tomie dePaola (Retelling of a Mexican Tale) Tracers for students for green leaves, red leaves (look like petals) and circles or do without the tracers. Attach four green leaves to a green circle - the circle becomes the back; attach six or seven red leaves on top; add a red circle in the middle; for the flowers use pieces of yellow tissue, crepe paper or yellow hole punch circles; add sparkles! Memories of G.P.

Book - The Legend of the Poinsettia

December 12 is National Poinsettia Day, an official day set aside to enjoy this symbol of holiday cheer. It was established upon the death of Mr. Poinsett to honor him and the plant he made famous. He died in 1851. Poinsettias are native to Mexico, where they grow wild. The enchanting legend of the poinsettia dates back several centuries, to a Christmas Eve in Mexico when a little girl named Pepita had no gift to present to the Christ child. Her cousin Pedro urged her to give a humble gift. So, on her way to church she gathered some weeds she found along the road. As she approached the altar, a miracle happened: The weeds blossomed into brilliant flowers. Then they were called Flores de Noche Buena – Flowers of the Holy Night. Now they are called poinsettias.