These locations were named after the Miguel Antonio Oteros.

Miguel Antonio Otero was the father of Governor Miguel Otero II.

Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)
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Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

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  • "Miguel Antonio Otero" in Hispanic Americans in Congress, 1822-2012. Prepared under the direction of the Committee on House Administration by the Office of the Historian and the Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. Washington: Government Printing Office, 2013.

    The naming of the three generations of Oteros is confusing and has been muddled by writers through the years. According to available evidence, the first Otero did not add any suffix to his name after his son was born. Modern historians often append Sr., but this cannot be considered correct as his son never used Jr. In , his son gave Otero the parenthetical suffix (I), but this probably was never used during Otero's lifetime. The second Otero also referred to himself without a suffix. But when clarification was necessary, as when describing his family in his autobiography, , he used the parenthetical suffix (II) and specifically not Jr., since that is what he called his son. It is incorrect to refer to the second Otero as Jr. The third Otero was known as Miguel Antonio Otero, Jr. But in , his father also refers to him as Miguel Antonio Otero (IV) -- not (III). Examples of these usages can be found in , pages iv, 280, 285, 286, and 292. Because the two older Oteros had exactly the same name, there remains confusion over places that were named for them. Best evidence suggests that all three were named after .[]

  • The naming of the three generations of Oteros is confusing and has been muddled by writers through the years. According to available evidence, the first Otero did not add any suffix to his name after his son was born. Modern historians often append Sr., but this cannot be considered correct as his son never used Jr. In , his son gave Otero the parenthetical suffix (I), but this probably was never used during Otero's lifetime. The second Otero also referred to himself without a suffix. But when clarification was necessary, as when describing his family in his autobiography, , he used the parenthetical suffix (II) and specifically not Jr., since that is what he called his son. It is incorrect to refer to the second Otero as Jr. The third Otero was known as Miguel Antonio Otero, Jr. But in , his father also refers to him as Miguel Antonio Otero (IV) -- not (III). Examples of these usages can be found in , pages iv, 280, 285, 286, and 292. Because the two older Oteros had exactly the same name, there remains confusion over places that were named for them. Best evidence suggests that all three were named after .[]

    The naming of the three generations of Oteros is confusing and has been muddled by writers through the years. According to available evidence, the first Otero did not add any suffix to his name after his son was born. Modern historians often append Sr., but this cannot be considered correct as his son never used Jr. In , his son gave Otero the parenthetical suffix (I), but this probably was never used during Otero's lifetime. The second Otero also referred to himself without a suffix. But when clarification was necessary, as when describing his family in his autobiography, , he used the parenthetical suffix (II) and specifically not Jr., since that is what he called his son. It is incorrect to refer to the second Otero as Jr. The third Otero was known as Miguel Antonio Otero, Jr. But in , his father also refers to him as Miguel Antonio Otero (IV) -- not (III). Examples of these usages can be found in , pages iv, 280, 285, 286, and 292. Because the two older Oteros had exactly the same name, there remains confusion over places that were named for them. Best evidence suggests that all three were named after .[]

     
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    19th-century American politicians > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    American politicians of Spanish descent > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    Hispanic and Latino American members of the United States Congress > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    Neomexicanos > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    American people of Spanish descent > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    Delegates to the United States House of Representatives from New Mexico Territory > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    Members of the New Mexico Territorial Legislature > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)

    New Mexico Democrats > Miguel Antonio Otero (born 1829)


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    Miguel Antonio Otero (October 17, 1859–August 7, 1944), nicknamed "Gillie," was governor of New Mexico Territory from 1897 to 1906 and in later life the author of several books on Western lore. He was the son of Miguel Antonio Otero, a prominent businessman and New Mexico politician.

Miguel Antonio Otero, Muguel A Otero

Miguel Antonio Otero was born in to and Doña Gertrudis Aragón de Otero. Don Vicente had held prominent civic positions as judge and mayor in Valencia County, under both Spanish and Governments.