A Pennsylvania Dutch A Christmas Carol - Facebook

An old-time Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas

Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas Coloring Book

$7.99
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  • Those in attendance were able to enjoy cookies and hot chocolate as Kershner continued on discussing the special local cooking traditions enjoyed by the Pennsylvania Dutch at Christmas. Today ham is a main staple of Christmas dinner. In the 1800s and early 1900s it was not at all uncommon for Christmas dinner to feature turkey and sauerkraut. Various recipes for cranberry jelly were prevalent and no Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas would be complete without a wide variety of Christmas cookies. "Belly Guts" was a very sweet candy with lots of molasses, pulled much like taffy and pulled into sticks. "Moshi Apples" were apples with a Moshe candy melted over them. These later became very popular at fairs and carnivals.

    Local author Gerry Kershner recently presented a talk at the Ephrata Public Library describing Christmas traditions unique to the Pennsylvania Dutch. A resident of Brickerville, his recently published book entitled "Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas" takes a look at particular traditions from our local area.

  • When I mention sand tarts to people who know and understand the regional component, they get excited and plead with me to make them a batch. I hope you and your family will enjoy this long time Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas tradition. You will have to hide the cookies though, because they are so thin and crisp, it’s easy to eat a dozen at a time. This was the first time I’ve made Pennsylvania Dutch sand tarts and now I’ll be making them every year.

    When I mention sand tarts to people who know and understand the regional component, they get excited and plead with me to make them a batch. I hope you and your family will enjoy this long time Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas tradition. You will have to hide the cookies though, because they are so thin and crisp, it’s easy to eat a dozen at a time. This was the first time I’ve made Pennsylvania Dutch sand tarts and now I’ll be making them every year.

  • When I mention sand tarts to people who know and understand the regional component, they get excited and plead with me to make them a batch. I hope you and your family will enjoy this long time Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas tradition. You will have to hide the cookies though, because they are so thin and crisp, it’s easy to eat a dozen at a time. This was the first time I’ve made Pennsylvania Dutch sand tarts and now I’ll be making them every year.

Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas Customs

Early Pennsylvania Dutch Christmas traditions included dying eggs with onion skins. We now associate this practice with Easter, but it was originally a Christmas practice in south-central Pennsylvania, where the decorative eggs would then be used to grace Christmas trees.