Absolute Infinite Crisis HC - Superman by Phil Jimenez *

Superwoman #1 by Phil Jimenez *

Superior Foes of Spider-Man by Phil Jimenez, colours by Marte Garcia *

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

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  • Jimenez would move on to craft the creator-owned project Otherworld for Vertigo and to write for DC Special: The Return of Donna Troy teaming with legendary artist José Luis García-López seeing the resurrection of the Wonder Woman supporting character from the dead. Returning as the new Harbinger, Troy teamed with the Teen Titans and Outsiders and became entrusted with the world of New Cronus and Universe Orb chronicling the history of the multiverse necessary for her role in the coming Crisis. The comparison between Phil Jimenez and George Pérez has often been made in the career of the former and where Pérez is arguably best remembered for his work on New Teen Titans, Wonder Woman, and Crisis on Infinite Earths, Jimenez had tackled the Titans and Wonder Woman, he would then get his shot at the latter. In 2005, writer Geoff Johns would produce a sequel to Crisis entitled Infinite Crisis with Jimenez brought on as the main penciller. When the Earth-Two Superman and Lois Lane, Earth-Prime Superboy, and Earth-Three Alexander Luthor battled the Anti-Monitor and tucked themselves away so the universe could heal itself, they thought they left the universe a better place. Instead, they observed a generation of heroes they felt dishonored the memory and betrayed the sacrifice of those heroes that came before. Luthor and Superboy formed a plan to create the Earth that should have been following Crisis by recreating the multiverse and picking and choosing components to make a perfect Earth and discard the remnants. The end result was the post-Crisis Earth generally with some Silver Age elements restored.

    The Invisibles was a team book created by Grant Morrison for DC Comics’ mature Vertigo imprint featuring the Invisible College, a clandestine organization resisting physical and psychic oppression, and starred a team led by King Mob (who was patterned in part after Morrison himself). Phil Jimenez would draw three issues of the original run but became the ongoing artist for the second volume to critical acclaim. Wizard Magazine would cite Jimenez as an up-and-coming artist who was comics’ best kept secret and should be drawing superhero comics. His work would also become nominated for a GLAAD award and an Eisner award (around this time Jimenez would be signed to an exclusive three-year contract to DC Comics). Fans would get their wish to see Jimenez return to superheroes when he teamed with writer Devin Grayson to produce the limited series JLA/Titans under the provision he would get to draw every member to ever grace the Teen Titans group (following George Pérez being given the opportunity to draw every Avenger in the pages of that title’s book prompting Jimenez to try and make their series as big as possible). The series would lead to Grayson’s The Titans series and Jimenez would go on to live out a lifelong dream.

  • In 2001, DC Comics mainstay Grant Morrison would largely make the move to Marvel by revamping the X-Men into the new series New X-Men (as well as would work on other projects like Marvel Boy and Fantastic Four: 1234). Morrison would again collaborate with Phil Jimenez when the artist was brought on to work on New X-Men for several issues. Jimenez had an abominable past history with the X-Men when he worked on X-Men: Liberators. Verbally agreeing with an editor to work on the book, which was a three-issue mini-series, the title was dropped and Jimenez had went to work on other projects. In the midst of doing JLA/Titans, the artist was called up to crank out the book immediately which had grown to four issues. Along with Team Titans, it was one of Jimenez’ most regrettable projects. His experience on New X-Men, however, must have been favorable as the creator was signed to an exclusive contract at Marvel in 2007 where he contributed to the controversial Spider-Man events One More Day and Brand New Day and became a frequent artist on Marvel’s flagship title The Amazing Spider-Man. Following this, he would draw an arc of Warren Ellis’ Astonishing X-Men (the pair previously collaborated on Planetary/The Authority: Ruling the World and an issue of Hellblazer called “Shoot” that long went unreleased due to the Columbine tragedy but later came out under Vertigo Resurrected).

    Phil Jimenez: I haven't had a typical work day in months. But generally, I wake up around 8:00-8:30, and then pencil on and off throughout the day—or ink, or write—in lots of fits and spurts, trying to remember to eat and go to the gym in there when I can. I often wonder if one day I'll be able to focus on just one project instead of many. I'm not sure how my ADHD would feel about that…

    Fearless Defenders #4AU preview pencils by Phil Jimenez

  • Fearless Defenders #4AU preview pencils by Phil Jimenez

    While Phil Jimenez was trying to cope with the trouble inherited with Team Titans, his partner Neal Pozner, who was HIV-positive when he began dating Jimenez, grew ill and passed away in 1994 from the disease. Jimenez would write and draw a mini-series for Aquaman’s former sidekick Aqualad, now going by the name Tempest, in a self-titled book featuring the hero in a costume similar to the one Pozner designed for Aquaman in his revision for the character. In the final issue, Jimenez wrote a tribute to Pozner dedicating the series to his memory and came out to the world as a gay man. The creator was surprised by the response to the issue, receiving over 150 letters including one from Iowa where the letter’s author couldn’t believe there were other gay people out in the world like him. It would be Jimenez’ next work that began to largely gain the interest of the comic book world.

Angela - Asgard's Assassin #6 interior art by Phil Jimenez *

Phil Jimenez (born , ) is an American comic book artist and writer, well-known for his work on , , , and . Jimenez makes no secret out of his professional admiration of famous comic book artist , whom he considers his primary influence, to the point where the two artists' art styles are nearly indistinguishable.