the seven deadly sins in literature ..

The 7 Deadly Sins Of Literature - BuzzFeed Community

Seven Deadly Sins

$18.95
  • Review
  • TAG : What are the 7 deadly sins and in what literature are the listed
ADD TO CART
  • The Seven Deadly Sins in Literature. Oblomov is your prototypical rich kid who can't make a decision (or an action) to save his life. Seriously, he doesn't get out of bed for the first 150 pages of the novel. Things (if you can imagine it) devolve from there. His fatalistic slackerism has even spawned its own term: Oblomovism.

    Today marks the release of Jami Attenberg’s , a portrait of a woman obsessed with food and the efforts (or non-efforts) of her family to get her eating under control. We can say pretty confidently that the book made us never want to overeat again, and we got to thinking about the other books that make us want to give up our vices. After all, any sin you can dream up has probably been written about, usually by someone French. After the jump, find examples of the seven deadly sins in literature (whether actually deadly or just unfortunate). Indulge in a little naughtiness-by-proxy, and then let us know which sinful characters we missed in the comments.

  • Today marks the release of Jami Attenberg’s , a portrait of a woman obsessed with food and the efforts (or non-efforts) of her family to get her eating under control. We can say pretty confidently that the book made us never want to overeat again, and we got to thinking about the other books that make us want to give up our vices. After all, any sin you can dream up has probably been written about, usually by someone French. After the jump, find examples of the seven deadly sins in literature (whether actually deadly or just unfortunate). Indulge in a little naughtiness-by-proxy, and then let us know which sinful characters we missed in the comments.

    In the Middle Ages, priests and poets alike were obsessed with sin, devising a variety of tools to teach their audiences about moral transgressions. Ecclesiastic and literary authorities formulated a number of different models for defining, representing, categorizing, and cataloguing sin in all of its various manifestations. The most popular and most long lasting of these models was the “Seven Deadly Sins.” But the use of this new system raised a number of questions for curious sinners and the writers who attempted to instruct them. Is sin a disposition, and action, or an external force? How does one make restitution for sin? Which sin is the deadliest and why? And how is confessing sins different from sharing sinful secrets? Over the course of this seminar, we will explores the various answers to these questions by analyzing late representations of the Seven Deadly Sins in medieval literature. We will investigate the ways in which theories of sin shifted throughout the period, but we will also consider the medieval underpinnings of modern depiction of the Seven Deadly Sins, such as David Fincher’s 1995 film, /Se7en/.

    Bloomfield, Morton. "The Seven Deadly Sins: An Introduction to the History of a Religious Concept, with Special Reference to Medieval English Literature." East Lansing: Michigan State College Press, 1962

    According to Bloomfield, "Gower is an important figure in the story of the seven deadly sins in English literature . . . [T]hey constitute a basic element of his worldview" (196). In all three major works, Gower demonstrates the kind of "proliferation of detail" (196) and propensity for symbolism in describing and classifying sin that is characteristic of late medieval and renaissance culture. For instance, Gower's references to alchemy and astrology are reminiscent of the classical linkage of the sins with their planets and metals. Likewise, Gower's association of the sins with particular animals and diseases (especially in the MO) demonstrates his systematic approach to life. [CvD]

    Item Type:Book
    Subjects:Backgrounds and General Studies
    Sources, Analogues, and Literary Relations
    Vox Clamantis
    Confessio Amantis
    Mirour de l’Omme (Speculum Meditantis)

    Gower Bibliography Editors Only: edit metadata

  • Today marks the release of Jami Attenberg’s , a portrait of a woman obsessed with food and the efforts (or non-efforts) of her family to get her eating under control. We can say pretty confidently that the book made us never want to overeat again, and we got to thinking about the other books that make us want to give up our vices. After all, any sin you can dream up has probably been written about, usually by someone French. After the jump, find examples of the seven deadly sins in literature (whether actually deadly or just unfortunate). Indulge in a little naughtiness-by-proxy, and then let us know which sinful characters we missed in the comments.

SEVEN DEADLY SINS British Literature

According to Bloomfield, "Gower is an important figure in the story of the seven deadly sins in English literature . . . [T]hey constitute a basic element of his worldview" (196). In all three major works, Gower demonstrates the kind of "proliferation of detail" (196) and propensity for symbolism in describing and classifying sin that is characteristic of late medieval and renaissance culture. For instance, Gower's references to alchemy and astrology are reminiscent of the classical linkage of the sins with their planets and metals. Likewise, Gower's association of the sins with particular animals and diseases (especially in the MO) demonstrates his systematic approach to life. [CvD]