Gypsy Rose Lee and Rosalind Russell in "The Trouble With Angels"

I have a scathingly brilliant idea! (The Trouble With Angels)

the trouble with angels | ... Harvester Loadstar Carpenter in "The Trouble with Angels, 1966

The Trouble With Angels

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  • Filter made tentative inroads toward age-appropriate rock on 2008's politically charged Anthems for the Damned but they throw all that away on its 2010 sequel, The Trouble with Angels. A full-blown return to the grinding '90s, The Trouble with Angels is all brickwalled guitars and vaguely menacing melodies supported by industrial rhythms given brawn by real drums. The real drums are a key here: the band doesn't sound as sequenced and hemmed-in as it did in the past; there's a messy, urgent pulse to the music. All the same, Trouble isn't that far removed from Short Bus: Richard Patrick hints as much by opening the album with "The Inevitable Relapse," a winking nod that this album is a slide back to the unfettered angst of 1995. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine, Rovi

    The Trouble With Angels (1966) Two high-spirited young students at St. Francis Academy For Girls keep things hopping for the challenged Mother Superior and her staff of bewildered Sisters.

  • "The Trouble With Angels" is truly a gem. Ostensibly a comedy about the efforts of two slightly disgruntled, high spirited teenage girls (Hayley Mills and June Harding) to turn a convent school upside down, it combines lighthearted pranks with dry humor, most of the latter supplied by the splendid Rosalind Russell. As the worldly and wise Mother Superior, Rosalind is both amused and unsettled at the stunts her two incorrigible charges pull. The supporting cast is well chosen, with Mary Wickes ("Sister Act") and Marge Redmond ("The Flying Nun") standing out among the faculty nuns. Despite the unexpected appearance of legendary stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, cast as (what else?) a teacher of interpretive dance, both nuns and students are believable. Mills sparkles in her role as devilish Mary Clancy, as does June Harding as Rachel Devery, her neophyte partner in crime. Aided tremendously by a truly beautiful score by the great Jerry Goldsmith, (which has the remarkable ability to blend in with the film AND stand alone as a pleasurable listening experience) and directed with a sure hand by actress/director Ida Lupino, "The Trouble With Angels" is both funny and moving, one of the best family films ever made. Strangely enough, reviews were decidedly mixed (when not downright negative) back when the movie was released in 1966. But it was a sizable hit, and spawned an agreeable sequel ("Where Angels Go, Trouble Follows") two years later. Today, it remains as fresh as ever, and head and shoulders above most of the contemporary family films which followed it.

    "The Trouble With Angels" is truly a gem. Ostensibly a comedy about the efforts of two slightly disgruntled, high spirited teenage girls (Hayley Mills and June Harding) to turn a convent school upside down, it combines lighthearted pranks with dry humor, most of the latter supplied by the splendid Rosalind Russell. As the worldly and wise Mother Superior, Rosalind is both amused and unsettled at the stunts her two incorrigible charges pull. The supporting cast is well chosen, with Mary Wickes ("Sister Act") and Marge Redmond ("The Flying Nun") standing out among the faculty nuns. Despite the unexpected appearance of legendary stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, cast as (what else?) a teacher of interpretive dance, both nuns and students are believable. Mills sparkles in her role as devilish Mary Clancy, as does June Harding as Rachel Devery, her neophyte partner in crime. Aided tremendously by a truly beautiful score by the great Jerry Goldsmith, (which has the remarkable ability to blend in with the film AND stand alone as a pleasurable listening experience) and directed with a sure hand by actress/director Ida Lupino, "The Trouble With Angels" is both funny and moving, one of the best family films ever made. Strangely enough, reviews were decidedly mixed (when not downright negative) back when the movie was released in 1966. But it was a sizable hit, and spawned an agreeable sequel ("Where Angels Go, Trouble Follows") two years later. Today, it remains as fresh as ever, and head and shoulders above most of the contemporary family films which followed it.

    Tracklisting
    1.Main Title
    2.Welcome to St. Francis
    3.First Warning
    4.A Pot of Tea
    5.The Dancing Lesson
    6.The Lifeguard
    7.The Trouble With Angels
    8.The Sewing Circle
    9.Future Plans
    10.Marching Band
    11.Rachel Says Goodbye
    12.End Title


  • The Trouble with Angels
    Columbia TriStar
    1966 / Color / 1:37 flat full frame (?) / 112 min. / Street Date November 11, 2003 / 24.95
    Starring Hayley Mills, June Harding, Rosalind Russell, Binnie Barnes, Camilla Sparv, Mary Wickes, Marge Redmond, Gypsy Rose Lee, Kent Smith
    Cinematography Lionel Lindon
    Film Editor Robert C. Jones
    Original Music Jerry Goldsmith
    Written by Blanche Hanalis (from a novel by Jane Trahey
    Produced by William Frye
    Directed by Ida Lupino

    Most reviews at the time praised the performances in The Trouble With Angels, but dismissed it as a formula film, although called it "funny in a light, warm style...well-served by Rosalind Russell's superb Mother Superior....Ida Lupino's skillful direction confidently treads the dangerous path between farce and pious melodrama, and consistently draws the most from every key scene." And the film was such a hit with audiences that it inspired a sequel, (1968), which also starred Rosalind Russell.

Be the first to ask a question about The Trouble With Angels

Given a huge marketing push, The Trouble with Angels was a big hit for Columbia in some pretty dark days, box office-wise. The ad campaign exploited visuals cribbed from the earlier Singing Nun posters, with a laughing Rosalind Russell riding a bicycle with her legs stuck out. Nothing of the kind happens in the film.