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Books by Chariot Victor Publishing

The Shadowseeker (Royal Institute of Magic)

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  • TAG : Victor Santiago doesn't really like books
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  • The Hunchback of Notre-Dame (French: Notre-Dame de Paris, "Our Lady of Paris") is a novel by Victor Hugo published in 1831. The French title refers to the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, around which the story is centered.

    The first six titles Victor is publishing through Bedford Square Books are, says Victor, “all classics in their field.” They will be published later this month and include:

  • Victor joined John Strachey, a Labour M.P., and Harold Laski, a political scientist at the London School of Economics, in 1916 to form the Left Book Club. In only three years, the membership had grown to 50,000. The club thrived, promoted socialism, and sold a lot of books. With Stafford Cripps, Aneurin Bevan, and others, Victor published a left-wing magazine, the It, too, was a great success.

    Victor Publishing, Inc. filed as a Domestic for Profit Corporation in the State of Florida and is no longer active. This corporate entity was filed approximately thirty-five years ago on Wednesday, July 22, 1981 as recorded in documents filed with Florida Department of State.

       
    Ernest Benn called Victor Gollancz a strong social activist and a publishing genius. In 1917, at the age of twenty, Victor was recruited to serve on a committee to help plan the reconstruction of Britain after the war. Four years later, William Benn introduced him to Ernest Benn, who hired him. Within six months of being hired, Victor suggested to his new employer that Benn publish a series of art books. The business grew from £2,000 to £250,000 in seven years.

    In 1927 Victor started his own company. In a few years he had published A. J. Cronin, Ford Madox Ford, Fenner Brockway, and G.N.H. Cole.

    Victor joined John Strachey, a Labour M.P., and Harold Laski, a political scientist at the London School of Economics, in 1916 to form the Left Book Club. In only three years, the membership had grown to 50,000. The club thrived, promoted socialism, and sold a lot of books. With Stafford Cripps, Aneurin Bevan, and others, Victor published a left-wing magazine, the Tribune. It, too, was a great success.

    In the late 1930s and early 1940s, Victor worked hard to help Jews escape Germany. He also founded the Jewish Society for Human Service.

    After the war, Victor played an active role in forming the National Campaign Against Capital Punishment. In 1958 he joined with Bertrand Russell, Michael Foot, and other prominent Englishmen to form the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).

    In later years Victor—VG, as he was called in his office—remained a great publisher: Kingsley Amis, John Updike, and Colin Wilson were only a few of his distinguished authors. (He lost Animal Farm and 1984 because his increasingly left-wing politics offended Orwell.)

    I saw Victor in London on numerous occasions. On a trip to New York in the mid-sixties, having heard good things about Wesley Towner’s unfinished Elegant Auctioneers, Victor contacted Wesley’s agent, Elizabeth McIntosh. She wouldn’t help him meet his potential author—no phone, no address. So I offered to have Wesley, Elizabeth, and Victor for dinner. It was a success. Victor met Wesley; they liked each other. Victor made a few unnecessarily nasty remarks about agents. But he left for London with a large part of Wesley’s manuscript, and then bought the English market rights after he returned to London. The Elegant Auctioneers was published successfully in New York (and in London) in 1970. Victor had loved the manuscript, but he didn’t live to see see the book. He died in 1967.

     

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