C. Wright Mills to his father, March 7, 1937

Books by C. Wright Mills: American and Foreign editions

"C. Wright Mills."  Encyclopedia of World Biography. 2004.  (July 12, 2016).

R. Clairborne to C. Wright Mills, May 15, 1959

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  • For a sympathetic assessment of Mills see the work by the American Marxist theoretician Herbert Aptheker, The World of C. Wright Mills (1960), and Irving L. Horowitz, ed., The New Sociology: Essays in the Social Science and Social Theory in Honor of C. Wright Mills (1964). Criticism of Mills is in Daniel Bell, The End of Ideology (1960; new rev. ed. 1961); various works by Robert Dahl, particularly Who Governs? (1961); and Raymond A. Bauer and others, American Business and Public Policy: The Politics of Foreign Trade (1963).

    As Rick Tilman (1984) has commented, life in New York City appeared to have suited C. Wright Mills well: ‘He led an extremely active intellectual life and published at a prodigious rate’. In 1946 From Max Weber: Essays in sociology appeared (translated and edited by Hans Gerth and C. Wright Mills). It proved to be a major contribution to an appreciation of Weber’s work by British and North American sociologists. Over the following ten years he also published his influential trilogy exploring aspects of power in America: The New Men of Power (1946) looks at organized labour and labour leadership; White Collar (1951)examines the changing nature of the middle class in the United States; and The Power Elite (1956) studies what he saw to be the new ruling elite in the States. During this period, with Hans Gerth, Mills also wrote Character and Social Structure (1953).

  • By the way, I don't know what C. Wright Mills would think of the New Left as it turned out, for he died in , before existential terrorism had clearly developed, but I like the Wikipedia image above, which reminds me of that other, still living New Leftist Noam Chomsky, and Wright did, after all, coin the expression "New Left" way back in , so he's definitely in the pantheon and deserves a place of honor.Labels: , , posted by Horace Jeffery Hodges @

    By the early 1950s C. Wright Mills had given up hope that the labour movement ‘was capable of stemming the tide of almost complete corporate capitalist domination of economic, political and cultural life’ (Aronowitz 2003). He had turned more strongly to theories of mass culture and mass society, and became more pessimistic about the possibility of effecting significant political change. This judgement was strengthened by his analysis of the new middle class in White Collar (1951).

  • The Sociological Imagination
    C. Wright Mills
    Limited preview - 1959

    As Rick Tilman (1984) has commented, life in New York City appeared to have suited C. Wright Mills well: ‘He led an extremely active intellectual life and published at a prodigious rate’. In 1946 From Max Weber: Essays in sociology appeared (translated and edited by Hans Gerth and C. Wright Mills). It proved to be a major contribution to an appreciation of Weber’s work by British and North American sociologists. Over the following ten years he also published his influential trilogy exploring aspects of power in America: The New Men of Power (1946) looks at organized labour and labour leadership; White Collar (1951)examines the changing nature of the middle class in the United States; and The Power Elite (1956) studies what he saw to be the new ruling elite in the States. During this period, with Hans Gerth, Mills also wrote Character and Social Structure (1953).

Eldridge, J E T (1983) C. Wright Mills. Chichester: Horwood.

This inaugural volume of the Pine Forge Press Social Thinkers series provides a concise introduction to the work, life, and influences of C. Wright Mills. Accessible and provocative, this book closely examines the writings and ideas of C. Wright Mills that now, over half a century later, remain crucial in better understanding today's world. The book's primary focus is on two of his lifelong intellectual concerns: the interrelationship between social structure and personality and the bureaucratization of modern society and the power relations it produces. The book is ideal for use as a self-contained volume or in conjunction with sociological theory textbooks.