James I. Rogers, Professor Zoe Trodd, James Underwood

Zoe Trodd and and Kevin Bales digs into narratives of personal slavery and liberation today.

Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century's Most Photographed American

$49.95
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  • TAG : Professor Zoe Trodd at WISE, University of Hull
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  • L to R: James Underwood; Professor Alison Yarrington (Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences); James I. Rogers; Professor Zoe Trodd (University of Nottingham); Professor Caroline Kennedy (Head of School of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies); Professor John Oldfield (Director, Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation).

    L to R: James Underwood; Professor Alison Yarrington (Dean, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences); James I. Rogers; Professor Zoe Trodd (University of Nottingham); Professor Caroline Kennedy (Head of School of Politics, Philosophy and International Studies); Professor John Oldfield (Director, Wilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation).

  • Zoe Trodd will share and analyze newly-discovered photographs Frederick Douglass. These photographs reveal that Douglass—rather than Lincoln, Whitman or General Custer, as scholars have previously claimed—was the most photographed American of the 19th century. More than any other American, he understood the implications of his country’s new fascination with the camera and believed that photography could operate as a catalyst for reform. He used these widely-circulated, commissioned and self-directed portraits to create a black public persona, out-citizen white citizens, counter racist iconography, and make an argument for freedom and equality. Professor Trodd will place Douglass at the center of the nation’s transformation from a textual culture to visual one in the years leading up to the Civil War, compare images from the pre- and post-Civil War eras, and trace Douglass’s visual journey from fugitive slave to firebrand radical and elder statesman. She will also outline the visual legacy of these 160+ photographs, especially in community murals and street art.

    Zoe Trodd American Protest Literature To Plead Our Own Cause The Tribunal Civil War America Picturing Frederick Douglass

    American writing that goes against the grain is not merely art or entertainment, says Zoe Trodd, 'but part of the democratic process. Dissent is patriotic.' (Staff photo Jon Chase/Harvard News Office)

  • "Why Don't You Get Acquainted With Your Race?": The Bookshelf and the Making of Black Middlebrow Culture in the 1920s
    Zoe Trodd

    The forgotten story of a book-review column and the black middlebrow; the process by which a communal effort turned Du Bois' model of the Talented Tenth on its head.

    Article: Print

    $US10.00

    Article: Electronic

    $US5.00

    Zoe Trodd
    Zoe Trodd is Professor and Chair of American Literature in the Department of American and Canadian Studies at the University of Nottingham. She has taught at Columbia University and has a PhD from Harvard University’s History of American Civilization department. She was a GLC Visiting Fellow in 2012. Her main focus is protest literature and visual culture, especially of slavery and abolitionism, and her books includes Modern Slavery: The Secret World of 27 Million People (2009), To Plead Our Own Cause: Personal Stories by Today’s Slaves (2008), American Protest Literature (2006) and a forthcoming book about the memory of 19th century abolitionism in the 20th century.

James I. Rogers, Professor Zoe Trodd, James Underwood

Convenors: Dr Laura Brace, University of Leicester, Professor Julia O’Connell Davidson, University of Nottingham, Professor Zoe Trodd, University of Nottingham and Dr Mark Johnson, University of Hull